Good preparation is everything

First, you have to apply for a course of studies. That means you must first decide whether you will seek a program with a degree, a partial course or a double degree.

In Dresden, Zittau and Görlitz you can study at the following institutions:

Have you received a certificate of admission? Yes! Congratulations!

Now you can begin planning your trip. You have to find out whether you need a visa to study in Germany or if a valid passport or national ID card will suffice. Also inquire about the documents you will need to apply for a residence permit.
In order to apply for a visa or residence permit, you will need among other things a certificate of admission and an official financial statement.

Falling ill is never fun, even less so when you’re abroad.

In Germany, health insurance is compulsory. But conditions, rates and reimbursement may vary greatly from provider to provider. So you should start looking around as soon as possible to find the insurance provider that is right for you. Without proof of insurance, you will not be able to enroll at university. Here is a list of all statutory health insurance providers.
There are also many private health insurance providers in Germany, but they are often significantly more expensive. It is also difficult to switch to a statutory health insurance provider once you have been insured privately.
Several countries (incl. EU member states) have social security agreements with Germany. This means that your health insurance may be accepted in Germany. Contact your health insurance provider to find out what documents you need to have your foreign health insurance accepted in Germany.

Studying abroad also means having the opportunity to learn a new culture, new people and of course a new language. The German language is not easy and many students assume they will not need the language since their entire course of studies will be in English. But this is not so! Besides, it would be a wasted opportunity to live in Germany for a time and not learn the language. Not everyone in Germany speaks perfect English – maybe you don’t either. We recommend learning some German in your home country before you depart. This will make your stay in Germany easier and more fun.

Some universities and institutions have a broad range of language courses, e.g.:

How and where can I find a place to live?

Studentenwerk Dresden offers a broad range of student housing options. You can choose between small flats for individualists, large apartments for families and countless single and double rooms in shared flats. For our international students who are only staying in Dresden for one semester, we have a special housing option in the student residence hall Fritz-Löffler-Straße 16 (FRITZ-multi-cool-tural).
Register online directly with Studentenwerk Dresden.
A room in student housing is one of the most affordable and least complicated ways to live in Dresden. In student housing, you will get the most value for your money.

If you do not receive a room or would rather look for yourself on the private market, you should be aware of a few guidelines:

  • Find out the current rent index in Dresden, Zittau or Görlitz. Affordable net rental fees may sometimes have high utilities.
  • In the private market, the rental fee listed is often only the net rent. Ask out about the fee for utilities (e.g. water, electricity, heating, Internet/phone, radio license fee, etc.).
  • No fees listed are binding until you sign the rental contract. Any verbal arrangements you make with your landlord legally binding.
  • It is normal in Germany to pay a deposit on an apartment. But real estate agents do not always take a commission. Try to find a commission-free apartment. This will save you money.
  • Shared flats (Wohngemeinschaften or WGs in German) are a common and affordable housing form in Germany. But it is increasingly difficult to find a room in a shared flat if you are not present in the city where you are searching

And here are a few more practical tips:

  • Do you know the way from the main train station or airport to your new apartment or to Studentenwerk?
  • Do you need liability insurance or other forms of insurance?
  • How will the weather be when you arrive in Dresden? In India, it may be 20 °C in December, but in Germany it can drop as low as -15 °C.
  • Bring a few passport pictures along.
  • Translate all the certificates and other documents you will need for registration.
  • Do you need a power outlet adapter?
  • How can I hook up to the Internet – at my new home and on-the-go on my smartphone?
  • In student dorms, you need to connect to the Internet via LAN cable. Do you have the right connector on your computer?